8 \ 190

The First Abyssal Inverse Dwelling Designer (First AIDD) had another innovation to add to the hidden private research station informally known as the Arch; not the first time this had been the case since it was active and inhabited. This generally reassured residents, as though the place couldn’t be falling apart if First AIDD Arjun Woollibee had time and resources to be coming up with something new.

He’d gone through various corridors hanging a type of minimal conduit, sticking it up like a holiday decoration. Arjun traded interestingly awkward smiles upon eye contact, being sure to alert the people in charge of each area that this was his intentional element in process. He was mostly able to proceed without additional questioning – he didn’t prefer to explain things before he’d gotten them working, and many understood this about him.

Back at his control base, he broadcasted a drill signal before he threw his lever. Along the conduits, the wavelength spectrum of genuine, not simulated, sunlight filled the halls. Benevolent ghosts of lost Anzi! After doing a personal victory jig right then and there, Arjun emerged for an applause stroll.

He was not disappointed, as everyone was delighted. In a larger chamber where the sunstrips glowed, someone in the congratulatory group asked how he’d gotten sunstrips to work through the profound abyssal layers of Foshan’s deepest oceans. “It’s a transmission. A particular pulse parts the water in an atomic scale stream, allowing in photons of natural daylight above. The pulse remains continuously connected with a current that keeps the conduit steady around the photon packeting, traveling between synchronized waveform coding inherent to the vibrative and receptive surfaces. We’ll receive the same daylight that shines above, with the same spectra, levels of natural intensity and times of rising and setting, as sunstrips normally work. And while we have the sunlight, we also have communications open to priority.” A moment of quiet while that sank in, then the room erupted in cheers.

Arjun walked back into his office eyes closed, both relishing the moment and feeling a drop in achievement adrenaline that heralded a sweet rest to follow. As he heard the door seal, he opened his eyes, and was as surprised by the sight in his office as people were about the sunlight in the halls.

7 \ 189

NAME/AGE
Bassel Ayo

PLACE OF RESIDENCE
Ionos Capital

HA235 PATIENT QUESTIONNAIRE
– How have you felt since returning home?
Fine

– How are your friends and family treating you?
Okay

– Would you say that readjusting has been easy or difficult?
Easy

– Do your affected senses seem better, worse, or the same as before?
Same

– Have you changed activities since your illness? If so, what has changed?
No

– When you think of Pyrean Midsummer, how do you feel?
Pyrean Midbummer

– What do you think of the care provided by the Imperium?
Good

6 \ 188

Raev lounged against the couching curve of the alcove, where he was viewing a covert signal extraction of imperial news programming in purple tint. He’d had a full day of instructing novice plumber-technicians in the new wing. This included a couple messes, because in all honesty, it had been a while since he’d been top teen helper for the plumbing at the Hirylien refugee situation. He had gotten really good at it though, even working with scraps. This time they had the good material in quantity, and they just had a smashing success with the simultaneous flush. Despite all their similarities to Humans, Vedani do not excrete solid waste, so this had been an exciting sociological foray.

In the little warping broadcast, the new King Proxem was making declarations about danger and safety. He urged people to take care of home, reminding them that they are, of course, the best that ever was.

All of this just kills Raev a little more, groaning as he collapses further. He then propped himself back up with an offensive gesture from his home planet.

Looking at each one of the attending royal children, he considered what was known about Mireille, Cristobal, and Carlo. He had a dad when he was Cristobal’s age, too. They’d look different if they knew what he’d done. It bothered him a little that he didn’t have a plan for them, though that was probably for the better.

Raev’s eyes drooped balefully at this guy in the image with his important persona, trying to look competent and real. Sturlusson could read the policy transitions between lines of speech, shifts after the passing of Celeste. Oh, Raev had hated her so much. Still, he might hate Vario more, knowing whose counsel and implementation were most critical in the massacre of his home world by biological warfare.

These wounds were starting to feel older, now. Surprising… maybe something had changed. Just then, a message reached him. Oh – it’s this one. Sturlusson hadn’t heard from er for a while, but remembered the conditions for next contact from the Red Nexus dragons. He considered the possibilities and reformed his sinews, exhaling exhaustion before giving this his attention.

5 \ 187

NAME/AGE
Vanessa Udar, 13

PLACE OF RESIDENCE
Ionos Capital

HA235 PATIENT QUESTIONNAIRE
– How have you felt since returning home?
I feel like I’m better, but I’m not sure. I test myself, maybe push a little harder to prove I’m doing as well as before. That might make things feel harder, like I’m harder on myself. I get tired sometimes. Didn’t I always get tired sometimes?

– How are your friends and family treating you?
I caught it, and so did my brother and my mom. My dad didn’t, and he’s been giving us special treatment since. Sometimes I don’t like it, and I wish things were just the way they were, whether or not my nostalgia is real. I try pretending it didn’t happen, but that doesn’t last long. Our friends brought food to the house, and welcome home gifts.

– Would you say that readjusting has been easy, or difficult?
Even though everyone’s so nice, I get down in the dumps sometimes. It’s not always easy. I start thinking about questions I can’t answer. Sometimes I stab the wall with knives and that helps me feel better! It’s an easy fix, and no one has a problem with it.

– Do your affected senses feel better, worse, or the same as before?
I don’t know. Better, maybe? Or I’m just growing up.

– Have you changed activities since your illness?
Knife stabbing of walls is the only slightly disturbing thing. I also now take a rowboat into the pond at the park, after school twice a week for an hour. At first I just floated around, but now I row more.

– When you think of Pyrean Midsummer, how do you feel?
I might skip the next one.

– What do you think of the care provided by the Imperium?
It’s the best anybody could have hoped for. Including this follow-up, which is a very caring thing.

4 \ 186

They all stood in the hallway corner, talking excitedly: representatives of every research discipline currently involved at the Arch, a place with the subaquatic capacity of half an Alpha orbit station and the curiosity of an interstellar species or two. Researchers threaded through the social knot they formed, turning back and forth between each other, talking. Some were leaning back on the wall with deep sighs and wide eyes, or clutching their heads and laughing. There were serious hushes, hands in front of mouths. The Hoopoe was there, Buckminster and Arjun Woollibee were there, Arys Steinman was there, Maryan Waters was there – anyone who wasn’t there didn’t hold a leading research position, but they most certainly did hear the building-wide broadcast of the classic tune, ‘Major Breakthrough’ by Silken Tongue.

In the past forty-eight hours (during which some had not slept), they’d been able to interpret the data they were receiving, then they’d translated it to human-range audio and listened to it, then they confirmed its origins, and now everyone here needed to know.

Leading up to this, they’d translated layers of patterns from their readings, which had been gaining in depth and texture of reception through their advancements. Their compartmentalized projects seemed to have co-evolved into sudden cooperation. ME & TH discerned and sorted timing signatures. EG & MW discovered and quantified tonalities. AL monitored and analyzed conditional factors. PM measured recurrence and reverberative derivatives. PR recorded particle arrangements as wave shapes. MC made amplitude comparisons. RH worked on recognizing nesting while RS & AS interpreted shapes. PA identified conjoining characters. RS calculated radiance and decay. KU wrote data-interlocking equations. RL sussed out source coordination. BW & AM kept up and kept ahead with instrument reception tuning. JM spearheaded creation of gap algorithms. Out of every 1-6 person team, some of them were here. Someone produced a camera and got them all to look at it, incredulous faces filling a hallway, five and more people deep.

They were all discussing the audio track they’d been listening to, which was not the song called ‘Major Breakthrough’. The implications of its evidence broke the rules of this world open to reveal another, real yet other. They’d suspected enough to get that far, but this told them so much more in a stunning fashion. What did they believe should be done about it?

Pointing to the papers in his hand, Arys Steinman turned to The Hoopoe asking, “Can we make a composition like this?”

“I’m going to say yes,” replied the lad, “but it will only be like it in certain ways, with our specific dimensional fingerprint, the way it contains its dimensional fingerprint. But I think I can make it fit like two halves of a locket, and please don’t ask for more explanation at this point. I’m pretty sure what I need is a specialty 6/15 Live Selector MatrixCube.”

Steinman received multiple key points from this reply one after the other for the first time. “Guessing from your context, that sounds like an item for music production.”

“Yeah. I’d want to order it custom, which I wouldn’t consider cheap, and will take a little more time than instant acquisition. Like the Charged Filter. And I need the premium software, and I’m going to mod it, which will void support and might mean legal fees. You can tell I’ve already thought about this.”

“If it’s mass market, then it costs no more than our toilet paper, even at custom rates. I second your request. We’ll have it sooner than anyone else can get it, and you can order the gold trim. We might even get them to work for us.”

“I think all we need to do is order one. We have to wait for a surfacing until we can send for it, right?”

“We’ll be coming up really soon. Priority.”